Students Can Own Their Learning

At times I take for granted how far my students have come in their ability to own their learning. It has not always been this way but over the past five years so much has changed in how I view students as learners and how I teach. Formative assessment is at the very core of these changes; the result – student ownership of learning.

This year, as visitors entered my room to view formative assessment in action, many educators spoke of how surprised they were at my students’ ability to articulate their learning. Students would quickly share what they were learning, how far they had come and where they still needed to go. They would pull out their criteria sheets and discuss how they could meet with success and share peer feedback, communicating how this helped improve their learning. This was also evidenced within students’ self-assessment pieces they shared on line, in journals and through discussions. The students were demonstrating how they learn best.

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But something happened on the last day of school that has left me in awe of the changes and growth that has occurred with so many of my students.  When I opened up the thank you gifts and cards something dawned on me, many of the cards were not written by parents but by the students themselves. In and of itself this might not be unusual but it was what was written that had taken me aback.   For many it was not a simple thank you but a  letter sharing their thoughts and feelings of the year(s) they has spent with me. It was not thanking me for the wonderful activities we had done, or the field trips that they participated in, but focussed rather on how they had grown and changed as learners. It really was quite something to read their words and understand the significance of what they were saying.

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A grade 7 student wrote:“You have pushed me to do my best and taught me to take risks and helped me to enjoy learning more. When I first came into grade six I was always worried about the final grade instead of taking risks with my learning and enjoying the process. Thank you so much for helping me realize learning is a journey we take through life and it is not about a final grade. You helped me understand that when we take risks we will make mistakes but instead of feeling sad we should use them to accomplish our goals.”

Another student shared: “Your learning strategies like peer feedback, reflections and self-assessments have been super beneficial to my learning. … You really inspired me to be a better learner; always challenging me to dig deeper.”

These are just two examples of the kind of letters the students wrote to me in their cards; I was, and still am, amazed at their words. Formative assessment practises can and do change the way students view themselves as learners. My evidence comes not from test scores but from the students themselves. To me there is no evidence more powerful than that.

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